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Ten of Rods card from the Old Path Tarot Deck

Learning Resources Base Ten Blocks Smart Pack

$10.05


Base 10 Plastic Ten Rods, Blue Set of 500


- Ten rods identical with the Red Rods in length, but divided into red and blue sections. The shortest rod is red. The second is twice the size of the first; one half is painted red and the other half is blue. The third rd is three times the size of the first and is divided into three sections; the first painted red, the second is blue, and the third red. All the other rods are divided in a similar fashion, alternating red and blue, the first section always being red. The number of sections represent the numbers of the rod.
- A floor mat


- Carry and assemble the rod as you would with the Red Rods.
- Do the Three Period Lesson to teach the names, be sure to count the red rods each time.
- Continue through the activities as the child is ready. You must be sure the child understands the quantities before moving on from the naming.
- Some children will be able to do this work in one sitting.
- Be sure to review previous names before moving on to new ones.
- Continue through the series on consecutive days.





- Ten rods identical with the Red Rods in length, but divided into red and blue sections. The shortest rod is red. The second is twice the size of the first; one half is painted red and the other half is blue. The third rd is three times the size of the first and is divided into three sections; the first painted red, the second is blue, and the third red. All the other rods are divided in a similar fashion, alternating red and blue, the first section always being red. The number of sections represent the numbers of the rod.
- A floor mat


- Carry and assemble the rod as you would with the Red Rods.
- Do the Three Period Lesson to teach the names, be sure to count the red rods each time.
- Continue through the activities as the child is ready. You must be sure the child understands the quantities before moving on from the naming.
- Some children will be able to do this work in one sitting.
- Be sure to review previous names before moving on to new ones.
- Continue through the series on consecutive days.




Interlocking Base Ten Rods (50 Pack) from Learning Resources | WWSM

  • Base Ten Rods, Green, Set of 50 (#7428)
  • Base Ten Rods And Units base ten blocks cubes - eta hand2mind

    The educationalists and had used rods to represent numbers, but it was Georges Cuisenaire who introduced the rods that were to be used across the world from the 1950s onwards. In 1952 he published , Numbers in Color, which outlined their use. Cuisenaire, a violin player, taught music as well as arithmetic in the primary school in . He wondered why children found it easy and enjoyable to pick up a tune and yet found mathematics neither easy nor enjoyable. These comparisons with music and its representation led Cuisenaire to experiment in 1931 with a set of ten rods sawn out of wood, with lengths from 1 cm to 10 cm. He painted each length of rod a different colour and began to use these in his teaching of arithmetic. The invention remained almost unknown outside the village of Thuin for about 23 years until, in April 1953, British mathematician and mathematics education specialist was invited to see students using the rods in Thuin. At this point he had already founded the and the , but this marked a turning point in his understanding:

    The educationalists and had used rods to represent numbers, but it was Georges Cuisenaire who introduced the rods that were to be used across the world from the 1950s onwards. In 1952 he published , Numbers in Color, which outlined their use. Cuisenaire, a violin player, taught music as well as arithmetic in the primary school in . He wondered why children found it easy and enjoyable to pick up a tune and yet found mathematics neither easy nor enjoyable. These comparisons with music and its representation led Cuisenaire to experiment in 1931 with a set of ten rods sawn out of wood, with lengths from 1 cm to 10 cm. He painted each length of rod a different colour and began to use these in his teaching of arithmetic. The invention remained almost unknown outside the village of Thuin for about 23 years until, in April 1953, British mathematician and mathematics education specialist was invited to see students using the rods in Thuin. At this point he had already founded the and the , but this marked a turning point in his understanding: